Showing posts with label water buffalo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label water buffalo. Show all posts

Aug 31, 2016

Mutton Do Pyaaza

 Mutton Do Pyaaza, beef, mutton, goat, lamb, buffalo, non veg, meat, indian, onions, recipe, easy, mughal, punjabi,

"Do" means two or twice and "pyaaza" means onions. As the name implies this classic North Indian dish features a lavish amount of onions. Onions are added in two stages, first slowly caramelized then ground with traditional spices to make a rich brown gravy. The mutton is then braised until tender in this bold mix of rustic flavors. This recipe also works well with lamb, beef, or water buffalo stew meat. Pair with with rotis, parathas, or chapattis for a hearty meal.

Mutton Do Pyaaza beef, mutton, goat, lamb, buffalo, non veg, meat, indian, onions, recipe, easy, mughal, punjabi,

Ingredients:
1kg/2lbs mutton/goat or lamb, cut into 3 inch pieces, bone in and lean preferred
1/4 C cooking oil
2 C onions, sliced thinly into half moons
1 tsp salt
2 C water or stock
Grind to paste for masala:
2 C onions, roughly chopped
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrak paste
1 TBS coriander/dhania seeds
1 TBS cumin/jeera seeds
1 TBS garam masala
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
10 black peppercorns/kali mirch
3 black cardamoms/kali elaichi
3-4 green chilis/hari mirch, chopped roughly
1 tsp salt

Here's what to do:
1) Grind ingredients listed under masala to smooth paste, set aside.



2) Heat oil in pressure cooker, deep heavy bottomed skillet, or kadhai. Fry thinly sliced onions with 1 teaspoon salt until golden brown, this should take about 10 minutes.



3) Add mutton pieces to fried onions in pan. Stir well and cook until meat is slightly browned.



4) Add ground masala paste to mutton and fried onions. Stir well and allow to fry for 5 minutes.



5) Add 2 C water or stock to the mixture in pan or enough liquid so meat is covered by at least a half an inch.  If using pressure cooker allow to steam for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using skillet or kadhai simmer covered over medium heat until meat is to desired tenderness, adding a half cup more water at a time if necessary (usually this takes at least two to three hours with goat.)


6) The dish should have a thick gravy when finished. If gravy is thin allow to simmer with lid off for a few minutes. Salt to taste and serve.

Helpful Hints:
I'm cooking a Nepali goat in these photos so I'm using a pressure cooker. If you're cooking this recipe with meat that is not as tough such as Kashmiri lamb or American beef you'd probably want to use a Dutch oven or deep skillet and reduce cooking times accordingly.

If you live somewhere that you can't get the pink Desi onions pictured, the yellow onions found in most western markets are the best substitute. Despite the different color they tend to have similar flavor profile & level of  sweetness.  Do not use red onions, 'sweet' onions, Walla Walla onions, or Vidalia onions in place of pyaaz. They tend to be too sugary, scorching easily & often resulting in a burnt taste.

After chopping and grinding all the onions required for this recipe you may find your hands reek of onions. Rubbing a slice of raw tomato on your hands will remove the onion smell immediately.

Mar 15, 2016

Railway Mutton Curry

lamb curry mutton goat coconut cream

So the story goes something like this: During the days of the British Raj while traveling on Indian Railways a British officer complained the mutton curry served was too hot for his liking. An ingenious Indian Railways chef deliciously tamed the fiery curry by adding coconut milk, yoghurt, and perhaps even some ground cashews. Vinegar or tamarind were also added to preserve the mutton in those days before refrigeration also giving the dish a unique flavor. Thus "Railway Mutton Curry" became a popular dish in it's own right and was served in restaurants as well as railway refreshment rooms and long distance trains throughout India.


This is my version of "Railway Mutton Curry." I've made a hot and fiery curry then dialed back the heat a bit with coconut cream rather than a slurry of cashews, yogurt, and or coconut milk. I've chosen to use tamarind paste rather than vinegar because I prefer tamarind's sweet and sour complexity over vinegar's one note tang. I also love how tamarind lends it's deep brown hue to the dish, and the coconut cream renders the gravy rich and velvety. 


Ingredients:
1kg/2 lbs mutton/goat, lean & bone in preferred, cut into 3-4 inch pieces
2 onions, sliced thinly into half moons
3 TBS cooking oil
2 tsp salt
2 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
2 TBS ginger/adrak paste
2-3 green chilis/hari mirch, chopped
5 cloves/laung
3 star anise, whole
2 tej patta/cassia leaves
15 black peppercorns, coarsely ground
2 inch piece of cassia bark/dalchini (or cinnamon stick)
3 tomatoes, diced finely
1 TBS garam masala
1 TBS ground coriander/dhania
1 TBS Kashmiri mirch
2 tsp ground cumin/jeera
1 teaspoon dried fenugreek leaves/kasoori methi
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
400 ml can of coconut cream
1 TBS tamarind paste

Here's what to do:
1)  In a pressure cooker or deep, heavy bottomed skillet or stock pot heat oil with 2 tsp salt for 5 minutes. Fry sliced onion until just beginning to brown. Add garlic, ginger, and green chilis and fry for 2 minutes.


2) Add cloves, star anise, black peppercorns, tej patta, cassia bark, to fried onion mixture and fry for 1 minute. Add diced tomatoes, garam masala, coriander, Kashmiri mirch, cumin, dried fenugreek leaves, and turmeric to pan, stir well and fry until tomatoes soften.


3) Add mutton pieces to mixture in pot, stir well and fry for 5 minutes.


4) Add the can of coconut cream and tamarind to mutton mixture, stir well.


5) Seal up pressure cooker & continue cooking for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using deep skillet or stock pot add enough water so that meat mixture is covered by at least 3 inches. Simmer without lid until meat is of desired tenderness, adding water if necessary. Salt to taste and serve.
When the mutton is tender and the oil is separated from the sauce, your dish is ready!

Helpful Hints:
This is one of those curries where you could probably get away with using tinned tomatoes, since we're trying to accommodate "Britishers" taste anyway.

This recipe would work well with beef, lamb, or water buffalo also.

Are you being served?
(The staff & engine of the exquisite "Palace on Wheels" luxury train.)


Mar 3, 2016

Kashmiri Ghanduh Maaz (Mutton with Onions)

mutton curry lamb onions kashmiri indian Kashmiri Indian easy recipe

In Kashmiri "ghanduh" means onion and "maaz" means mutton. This hearty homestyle dish is commonly served in Kashmir and has a rich, spicy broth much like a stew. So easy to make for a delicious Fall or Winter meal, serve with steamed rice, pulao, rotis, or a simple loaf of crusty bread. This recipe also works well with lamb or beef stew meat.

Mutton is a daily staple in a Kashmiri household, chicken and fish are almost considered vegetables. You have not properly eaten in Kashmir unless your meal contains some form of mutton. It is considered the utmost in Kashmiri hospitality to serve a guest as much mutton as possible. (Even if they are vegetarian.) This recipe also works well with lamb or beef stew meat.

Ingredients:
1 kg/2lbs mutton/goat or lamb, cut into 3 inch pieces, bone in preferred
3 TBS cooking oil, (mustard oil if you wish to be authentic)
2 tsp salt
2 C onions, sliced into wedges
1/2 C tomatoes/tamatar, diced finely
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrak paste
1 TBS coriander/dhania, ground
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp paprika plus 1 tsp cayenne)
1/2 tsp dry ginger/adrak
1/4 tsp turmeric/haldi
5 cloves/laung
7 green cardamoms/elaichi, bruised with mortar & pestle
2 inch piece cassia bark/dalchini
1&1/2 tsp cumin/jeera seeds
15 black peppercorns/kali mirch, coarsely ground
1 cassia leaf/tej patta or 2 small ones

Here's what to do:
1) In a pressure cooker or deep, heavy bottomed skillet or stock pot heat oil with 2 tsp salt for 5 minutes. Add mutton pieces and fry until beginning to brown. Depending on how fresh your mutton is, or whether you're using lamb or beef, this may take 10 to 15 minutes.

This is the brown we're looking for.
The Kashmiris call this "red."
2) Add onions and tomatoes. Stir well and continue cooking until onions are translucent and tomatoes have softened, about 5-7 minutes. (This is not a browned onion dish.)


3) Add 1/2 C water, garlic paste, ginger paste, whole spices, powdered spices, and cassia leaves/tej patta. Stir well and simmer for 5 minutes.


4) Add 3 cups water or at least enough so there is water covering the meat mixture if using pressure cooker. Seal up pressure cooker & continue cooking for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using deep skillet or stock pot add enough water so that meat mixture is covered by at least 3 inches. Simmer without lid until meat is of desired tenderness, adding water if necessary. Salt to taste and serve.

Helpful Hints:
If you are married to a Kashmiri do not ever be a dumb "nabrim" (outsider) and serve your Kashmiri in laws chicken or fish without at least one mutton dish at a meal. I'm still not hearing the end of it. Who knew?

Mutton? NAH!!!

Feb 12, 2016

Kathmandu Style Mutton Curry

Nepal is an amazing place of beautiful mountains, lush valleys, and rich cultural heritage. Although it is a tiny nation only about the size of the American state of Arkansas,  it is home to many different ethnicities and cuisines. All Nepali cuisines are influenced by it's neighbors: India, Tibet, and China. This curry's fusion of Indian spices with the Chinese touch of spring onions results in uniquely Nepali dish. I first tasted this delicious curry in a restaurant in Nepal's very multicultural capital, Kathmandu.


Nepali mutton curry kathmand

Ingredients:
1kg/2lbs goat/mutton, lean & bone in preferred, cut into 3 inch pieces
3 TBS cooking oil (mustard oil if you wish to be authentic)
1 TBS ghee
2 C onions, finely sliced into half moons
3 cassia leaves/tej patta
1/4 C cilantro/dhania, chopped roughly
3 spring onions, green tops only snipped into 1 inch pieces
Grind to smooth paste for marinade:
1/2 C yogurt/dahi
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger paste
1 C onion, roughly chopped
1 C tomato, roughly chopped
1 TBS ground coriander/dhania
1 TBS ground cumin/jeera
2 tsp fennel/saunf seeds
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp cayenne plus 1 tsp paprika)
2 tsp garam masala
1/2 tsp turmeric
2 tsp salt

Ingredients for marinade.
Here's what to do:
1) Grind all ingredients listed under marinade to smooth paste in mixie, food processor, or blender.

The marinade is mixed.
2) In an airtight container combine marinade paste with mutton, make sure each piece is thoroughly coated. Seal container and allow meat to marinate for at least four hours or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

All meat pieces thoroughly coated in marinade.

Sealed up & ready to go into the refrigerator.

3) When ready to cook, heat oil and ghee in pressure cooker or a deep, heavy bottomed skillet. Fry finely sliced onions until a deep brown.


4) Add tej patta/cassia leaves and mutton pieces, and marinade to the fried onions. Stir well and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer stirring frequently for 8 minutes. If mixture begins to scorch add 1/4 C water, reduce heat and continue cooking.


5) If using pressure cooker add chopped cilantro/dhania, snipped spring onion tops, and 3 C water to mixture and stir well. Seal pressure cooker and allow to cook for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using deep, heavy bottomed pot or skillet add chopped cilantro/dhania, snipped spring onion tops, and enough water to cover mixture by 2 inches. Stir well and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer until meat is to desired tenderness and gravy is to desired consistency. The traditional Nepali way to cook this kind of curry is to allow it to slowly simmer over a couple of hours, adding water in small amounts (usually 1/2 C water at a time) until meat is to desired tenderness and gravy is to desired consistency.


6) Salt to taste and serve with steamed rice, achaari/pickles, a tarkaari/vegetable dish, a fresh chutney/chatni, and roti. Actually it's great with just buttered hunk of French bread too.


Helpful Hints:

Not fond of goat? This recipe works well with beef, lamb, venison, or water buffalo stew meat also.

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