Showing posts with label tuberose. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tuberose. Show all posts

Nov 27, 2017

Perfume Review: Twilly D'Hermès

twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,

On our recent trip to Delhi, I had a chance to try the new fragrance: Twilly D'Hermès. I'm not a big Hermès fan but the simplistic notes listed for this new fragrance intrigued me- ginger, tuberose, and sandalwood. And who could resist this campaign spiel:

"The scent of the Hermès girls, Twilly d'Hermès is a daring fragrance woven with striking ginger and sensual tuberose—floral, spicy, and oriental. Ginger, tuberose, and sandalwood are given a new twist. Combined differently, they become searing spice, a disconcerting attraction, a revelation of the carnal." 

twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,
Grace Kelly: "It's Air-maysss, dahlings!"
Hermès is IMMENSELY popular in Asia nowadays. A Twilly is the iconic brand's long thin ribbon-like silk scarf. They are worn mostly by young fashionistas/os in all sorts of ways: as neck scarves, headbands, wristbands, belts, or purse accessories tied in a bow on the handle. Your bog-standard 32" x 2" Twilly costs about $160. I have seen many South Delhi Brats ferrying their Kellys, Lindys, and Birkins about with a Twilly festooning the handle. Apparently, youngsters find the Twilly less matronly than the 35" x 35" traditional Carré scarf. 

twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,
Start'em young, Hermès!
The ad certainly seems to target young girls. The campaign straddles the line between not too hip and not too twee. The bottle with its derby hat lid and jaunty silk necktie certainly suggests something stylish yet fun. Looks like the perfect fragrance for a young girl's first "grown-up" perfume. My initial thoughts were something along the lines of "Ooo! A bubblegummy tuberose paired with bright, lemony ginger? The American Bazooka brand bubblegum's original flavor is a mild ginger with vanilla.That actually sounds like an interesting twist on the floral-fruity genre. 
twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,
Christine Nagel
(Hey Goody! She's got your glasses!)

"It is with young women in mind, by observing their lives, that I created Twilly d’Hermès. Free, bold, and irreverent, they swim against the tide, impose their own rhythm, invent a brand new tempo."
- Christine Nagel

Christine Nagel is the new house perfume at Hermès replacing Jean-Claude Ellena. Mr. Ellena has developed Hermès' perfumery style as minimalistic, transparent, and focussed on a key accord. He usually achieved this by using copious amounts of the popular synthetic Iso E Super. Christine Nagel's style is apparent in her creations such as Armani Si, Versace WomanNarciso Rodriguez For Her, Karl Lagerfeld for Her, and Miss Dior Cherie.


twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,

Upon two sprays applied to the inner wrist: A very earthy, peppery, ginger followed by a shrill, sweet orange blossom note that lingers for about 10 minutes then disappears. There's a green, herbaceous note that's almost licorice-y? After about twenty minutes all that's left is a bit of creamy sandalwood and a slightly vanillic musk. So I guessed the orange blossom was supposed to be the hint of tuberose washed clean of any trace of indoles. (Apparently, indoles are equated with 'old lady' perfumes in the younger set.) What was that earthy, peppery, herbaceous, licorice note that bunged up the lemony ginger?

twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,

A little internet research led me to determine that this note was a new synthetic musk called Polvolide from the Japanese company Soda Aromatics. Polvolide is a potent macrocyclic musk with a herbal-spicy, fennel-anisic side. According to the description on Soda Aromatics' website the musk's fragrance is also “luminous,” "like a flower suddenly blooming," and has a "powdery fragrance that Japanese people like." Musks are one of those strange molecules that seem to be perceived differently by everyone. Some people are completely anosmic to particular musks and some can only detect certain facets of them. Women’s sensitivity to musk is 1,000 times greater than men’s. Evidently, my olfactory bulb picks up on the fennel-anisic side of Polvolide and interprets its powderiness as vanillic. Your mileage may vary.

twilly, hermes, Twilly D'Hermès, perfume, review, polvolide, tuberose, sandalwood, ginger,
Will the young ladies love Twilly D'Hermès? I don't know. Thankfully it's not another hyper-sweet sugar bomb or pink fruitichouli like most other recent fragrances marketed for girls. It definitely wasn't "a revelation of the carnal" as the ad implied. I'm not a huge fan of Hermès' minimalistic and abstract fragrances anyway, I prefer a little bombast for my dollar.  I would give it kudos for originality though and would definitely like try it on my skin again. If only the ginger were the "searing spice" and the tuberose a "disconcerting attraction" as advertised.

Anyone else try Twilly D'Hermès? What did you think?
I hope all of my American readers had a lovely Thanksgiving!

Toodle-pip!

Bibi


Sep 11, 2017

Perfume Review: Houbigant Orangers en Fleurs

life, love, houbigant, Orangers, Orangers en Fleurs, perfume, fragrance, review, orange blossom, tuberose, Turkish rose, ylang-ylang, Egyptian jasmine, nutmeg, eau de brouts, cedar, musk,
Orangers en Fleurs eau de parfum
Today I thought I'd do a review of my favorite perfume, Houbigant's Orangers en Fleurs. This new interpretation of orange blossom is not just a simple soliflore. It's a lush bouquet of orange blossom, tuberose, Turkish rose, Cormoros ylang-ylang, and Egyptian jasmine. Spicy nutmeg, eau de brouts, sheer cedar, and a base of clean musk temper this heady white floral. I'm certain reading Bibi rave about this overlooked gem is far more interesting than listening to her kvetch and crab about the Monsoon heat, eh? 
Matryoshka dolls
I first came across this perfume in a small duty-free shop in Moscow's Sheremetyevo International Airport in 2015. I had a 7 hour layover and was leisurely perusing all and sundry luxury goods on offer in the airport. I was expecting amber, vodka, caviar, matryoshka dolls, t-shirts, and perhaps furs? Nope! It was all perfumes and makeup - Bibi's most favorite things! And we're talking everything in the way of fragrance- Amouage, Montale, Escentual Molecules, Juliette has a Gun, Clive Christian, Chanel, Hermes,-you name it they had it. Bibi was in perfume heaven!!! So after about an hour of sampling at the bigger shops I stumbled across this tiny boutique at the end of the terminal. This little boutique had quite an odd assortment of brands. One wall was devoted to the Arabian brand Ajmal, there was a small selection of uber expensive Amouages, and another counter had an assortment of trendy niche brands like Byredo. I tried a few Byredos and other niche offerings and was rather unimpressed. I've already tried every Ajmal in existence so I declined sampling those. Then I spotted the tackiest 70's looking clear lucite display you can possibly imagine on the back wall. 
Orange blossoms
The garish fluorescent-lit display was devoted to three new offerings from Houbigant: Fougère Royale, Quelques Fleurs Royale, and Orangers en Fleurs. I was thoroughly underwhelmed upon trying the Quelques Fleurs Royale (2004). I tried the new version of Fougère Royale and was AMAZED but I know the Sheikh would never wear anything that bold or complex. The pristine crystal flacon of Orangers en Fleurs intrigued me. An orange tree in bloom? That sounds like a rather unoriginal and uninspiring premise for a luxury fragrance. However, white florals are my jam so I had to try it! And it was love at first sniff. Like the heavens opened up on that grey September day in Moscow and a brilliant beam of white floral bliss sparkled down from paradise. I asked the price. The saleslady said $80. I said, "I'll take it!" The owner of the store exclaimed loudly, 
"But that's the cheapest perfume in the whole store!" 

I replied, "It's the best thing I've tried in the entire airport." Her eyebrows about flew off her head. Guess they have crappy service in Russia too.
life, love, houbigant, Orangers, Orangers en Fleurs, perfume, fragrance, review, orange blossom, tuberose, Turkish rose, ylang-ylang, Egyptian jasmine, nutmeg, eau de brouts, cedar, musk,
My box has a white satin lining not this pink bathroom wallpaper stuff.
So I waited patiently until I arrived in Delhi to unbox my new treasure. I opened the immaculate white box stamped with a gilded logo of stylized orange blossoms and lined with elegant white satin. The crystal flacon has a nice heft to it but I will say I was a bit disappointed that the cap is plastic. I spritzed myself lightly before dinner. Would this turn out to be a disappointment as some other love (or like) at first sniff purchases have been? Would it simper off into nothingness in the searing heat of Delhi or morph into something monstrous? The sharp opening of the dry, gorgeously green, and petitgrain-like note of the eau de brouts was refreshing in the heat of the Subcontinent. The honeyed brightness of the orange blossom came shining through next. But then the real star of the show came forward...

Tuberose
A lush and buttery tuberose! The heady tuberose is the perfect foil for the soapiness of the orange blossom. Then Egyptian jasmine absolute appears adding further warmth yet remaining elegant, not animalistic. The prim Turkish rose absolute imperceptibly blends with the orange blossom. Cormoros ylang-ylang brings yet another facet with it's tropical note. Nutmeg chimes in delicately with a subtle citrusy spiciness completely in harmony with the orange tree theme. The cedar is so sheer it simply comes across as part of the tree. As the fragrance dies down a base of clean white musk is revealed. Nectarous orange blossom does continue to linger well into the dry down lightly hovering over the musk for hours (if not days). A deeper whiff reveals that intoxicating tuberose seductively lurking. This perfume gets an A+++ from me for a tenacity of over 12 hours in withering South Asian heat and humidity. In spite of this longevity it remains a well-behaved white floral that never goes indolic, sweaty, skanky, or fecal- YOU CAN WEAR THIS IN THE ELEVATOR!

YAY! A white floral that won't asphyxiate people in close quarters.
I've read reviews complaining that Orangers en Fleurs is overly simple, unoriginal, and just pretty. It is a very traditional floral-woods-musk composition. For me it's simple beauty and sophistication harken back to the classic style of Houbigant's older floral fragrances such as the iconic Quelques Fleurs, Les Violettes, and La Rose France . The perfumer is showcasing the quality of ingredients and their innate complexity perfectly. All those gorgeous absolutes are multifaceted and develop quite enough to keep me interested. This is also one of those amazing perfumes that definitely has a vintage feel to it but is somehow thoroughly modern too. No synthetic sleight of hands nor artifices required. Sometimes pretty and uncomplicated is what's called for. I certainly don't want to compete with the cacophonous and often overwhelming stench of South Asia. At least it isn't yet another one of those ubiquitous pink fruitichouli or gourmand things so popular nowadays!

life, love, houbigant, Orangers, Orangers en Fleurs, perfume, fragrance, review, orange blossom, tuberose, Turkish rose, ylang-ylang, Egyptian jasmine, nutmeg, eau de brouts, cedar, musk,

Orangers en Fleurs was launched by Houbigant in 2012. Apparently, it was initially only available at Bergdorf-Goodman and Neiman Marcus. The price started out at the princely sum of $180 for 100mls of the eau de parfum and $600 for 100mls of the parfum. I've now seen the eau de parfum priced as low as $60 for 100mls at online discounters. It's such an underrated bargain! I'm not sure if it wasn't a huge success because florals aren't trendy now or that hip niche houses are considered more fashionable ? I do have to say that Houbigant could have done a lot better with their marketing of the fragrance. I mean look at that ad -
WHY ARE THERE PINK ALMOND BLOSSOMS ON AN AD FOR AN ORANGE BLOSSOM FRAGRANCE!?! 
Pink has nothing to do with this fragrance!!!! White, green, and gold are the colors of this perfume. Almonds?!?

Kirsten Dunst as Marie-Antoinette frolicking at the (relatively) understated surroundings of the Petit Trianon
Houbigant has a long history of purveying to the French, British, and Russian aristocracy. Obviously, Houbigant wished to draw on it's legendary past with that classic Baccarat style flacon and the retro floral feel of Orangers en Fleurs. Marie-Antoinette was a famed client of Houbigant whose passion for feigned rusticity started the trend to lighter floral scents. Because of Marie-Antoinette the dense animalics so popular in the 17th century faded from popularity. Ethereal and elegant compositions of florals and woods became en vogue. Why not get a Kirsten Dunst look-a-like in a flimsy muslin chemise a la reine lolling about the Petit Trianon sniffing an orange blossom posy for the ad? Or just a boxed orange tree amongst the parterres of the Orangerie at Verailles in the background to infer an aristocratic bent?

Queen Victoria's wedding portrait
Here's another royal patron of Houbigant with a love for orange blossoms. Queen Victoria donned a pastoral coronet of orange blossoms on her wedding day. Her white gown and orange blossom headpiece set the style for western weddings for the next 200 years. Why not a simple orange blossom wreath or tiara next to or around the bottle for the ad? Oh well, I doubt Houbigant will be calling me for advertising advice.
life, love, houbigant, Orangers, Orangers en Fleurs, perfume, fragrance, review, orange blossom, tuberose, Turkish rose, ylang-ylang, Egyptian jasmine, nutmeg, eau de brouts, cedar, musk,
Boxed set of Orangers en Fleurs eau de parfum with scented lotion
(What is up with that tacky peach and green print on the box? It looks like a feminine hygiene product.)
Anywho, by now you've probably guessed that I absolutely love this perfume. From start to finish this perfume is just absolute perfection. Indeed, if I had to choose a signature scent- this would be it! Despite florals not being 'on trend' nowadays I get all sorts of compliments on this fragrance. A Chinese lady chased me down the street in Kathmandu last month wanting to know what the "powdery" perfume was that I was wearing. The Sheikh can be rather persnickety about perfumes but he has actually asked me to wear this one! I'd love to try the extrait. The eau de parfum is pretty potent so I'm curious as to how the stronger extrait would wear. I'm not certain if I could convince the Sheikh it's imperative that we buy a $600 bottle of parfum for me to try though ;)

What's your favorite perfume?
Any new white florals or tuberoses out there you think I should know about?
I am anxiously awaiting Gabrielle (the new Chanel tuberose)!
Hope your Summer went well and you're ready for a glorious Fall!
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