Showing posts with label stick. Show all posts
Showing posts with label stick. Show all posts

Mar 1, 2016

Tamatar Dhania Chatni (Tomato and Cilantro Chutney)

Tamatar Dhania Chatni Tomato and Cilantro Chutney

Ever the iconoclast, Bibi whizzed the ingredients of her favorite Mexican salsa through the mixie. "Et voila!" she had a delicious chutney! Yes, it tastes every bit as good with tortilla chips and atop tostadas as it does with rice and chapattis. A brilliant "fusion" dish you say? Nah, just a classic, piquant, combination of fresh herbs, fruits, and vegetables that always reminds me of summertime in my native California. You simply can't improve on that. It's also fat free, vegan, vegetarian, paleo, halal, gluten free, and probably some other hip things I don't even know about. But most importantly, it is "que delicioso!"

Tamatar Dhania Chatni Tomato and Cilantro Chutney

Ingredients:
2 tomatoes, roughly chopped
1 C cilantro/dhania, roughly chopped
4 green chilis/hari mirch
4 garlic cloves/lahsun
1/4 C onion, roughly chopped
1 TBS lime juice
1 tsp salt

Here's what to do:
1) Place all ingredients in mixie, food processor, or blender and grind until smooth. Salt to taste. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Tamatar Dhania Chatni Tomato and Cilantro Chutney
The mighty mixie mixes chutney!
Helpful Hints:
Feel free to adjust the proportions of the ingredients to suit your tastes and what you have on hand. This recipe is practically "un-screw-uppable," within reason of course.

Dec 22, 2015

Ingredient of the Week: Dalchini, Cinnamon stick, or Cassia bark?


This is what is called dalchini or referred to as a "cinnamon stick" in South Asian cooking:



A bit thuggish & crude in appearance compared to the cinnamon sticks of the western world.

It's actually the dried bark of the Cinnamonum cassia tree (also called the Chinese cassia or Chinese cinnamon tree). Yes, it is from the same tree as 'tej patta' or Indian bay leaf.

"True cinnamon" from the Cinnamonun verum tree.

It is not the same as those tightly rolled & thinly layered cinnamon sticks you see in western countries. Those delicate, rolled cinnamon sticks you see in western countries are 'true cinnamon' which comes from the Cinnamonun verum tree (also called Sri Lanka cinnamon or Ceylon cinnamon).


A Chinese cassia tree whose dried bark is called "dalchini."


Cassia bark (or dalchini as it is called in Desi-dom) has a stronger, almost peppery bite compared to its sweeter, subtler, & more aromatic Sri Lankan cousin.  Cassia bark/dalchini also stands up to the intense heat of the pressure cooker or kadhai better than the delicate Sri Lankan cinnamon quills. The spicier, peppery notes of cassia bark/dalchini suit savory dishes likes curries & stews better than it's sweeter cousin also.

Personally, I prefer to bake with ground cassia bark/dalchini rather than true cinnamon as I like a spicier punch to my cakes, cinnamon buns, cookies, & quick breads. If you are using cinnamon to enhance the natural sweetness of strawberries, cherries, or fruit pie fillings (as many Scandinavian, Swiss, Ukrainian, & German recipes do) then I'd choose to use the Sri Lankan or true cinnamon. My Swiss friend in Mumbai, Cyn, will attest to this. You can check out Cyn's blog at http://www.homecynhome.com


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