Showing posts with label Indian. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Indian. Show all posts

Sep 25, 2017

Ingredients: Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

The Indian gooseberry, emblic, amalaki, myrobalan, or amla is the fruit of a small to medium-sized tree native to India. The spherical berries are greenish yellow with a fibrous texture. Hand harvested in Autumn, the fruit has a tart, bitter, and astringent taste. The amla tree is considered sacred in Hinduism and is a a staple of traditional Ayurvedic medicine.


Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

The amla tree or Phyllanthus emblica grows from 1 to 8 meters (pictured below) in height. It can be found on the plains and sub-mountainous regions of the Indian subcontinent up to nearly 2000 meters above sea level. Its varied natural habitat spans from Burma to Afghanistan and from the Deccan plateau in south India to the foothills of the Himalayas.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

The Indian gooseberry tree has smooth, gray-brown bark. The leaves are fern-like, oblong, narrow, and up to 2 cm in length much like a tamarind tree. The flowers are inconspicuous and light green in color. An amla tree takes around 5 years to start producing fruit when propagated from seed. It also requires a well-drained loamy soil and full sun exposure. The Indian gooseberry is a deciduous tree that often drops branchlets as well as individual leaves, but generally retains some of its greenery at all times. Amla cultivars are available such as "Chakaiya" or "Banarsi" which reportedly produce better and more prolific fruits than their wild cousins.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

Amla berries are preferably picked by hand after they turn from green to greenish yellow or greenish white in the Fall. It is recommended to check the seeds inside one berry before picking all of the berries. Seeds that have turned from white to black indicate the fruit is ripe.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

Amla is described in the ancient texts of Ayurveda as a peerless panacea. The fruit, seed, leaves, roots, bark, and flowers of the plant are used in various preparations in Ayurvedic and Unani healing. Amla not only balances all three doshas but purportedly cures everything from dandruff to diabetes! Most advertisements for therapeutic amla products attribute the fruit's benefits to it's rich content of vitamin C. The advertisements sometimes bizarrely claim vitamin C from amla is far more potent than ordinary vitamin C. Recently, it has been shown that amla does not contain any significant amount of vitamin C at all!

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala
β-glucogallin 
What does amla contain? A  mix of organic acids, common tannoids, and some unique tannins. One or more of these unique tannins was mistaken for vitamin C in the initial qualitative analysis conducted on amla more than 50 years ago. In 2014 a new HPLC method for the characterization and analysis of the various constituents of amla fruit was developed by the Sabinsa Corporation. This new spectral technique allowed a research team at Sabinsa Corporation to determine that β-glucogallin and mucic acid gallates are the predominant active molecules in amla rather than ascorbic acid (vitamin C).  This novel combination of  β-glucogallin and mucic acid gallates appears have high antioxidant activity and is much more stable than vitamin C (ascorbic acid). I was unaware that tannins had antioxidant properties. I hope these tannins do not cause bezoars, liver or kidney damage as some can.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala
A happy and prosperous amla grower.
The popularity of amla for use in Ayurvedic remedies has led to problems for wild amla trees. Foragers often take a deleterious short-cut in collecting the fruits from wild trees. Instead of climbing the wild trees and carefully picking each fruit by hand they resort to lopping off large fruit-laden branches which can eventually kill the trees. As a result some areas have been virtually denuded of these valuable wild trees. Government and non-government agencies in India are undertaking efforts to educate foragers to avoid such destructive practices and encourage the development of commercial plantations of amla trees.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala


The Indian gooseberry or amla is often confused with the common gooseberry for some reason. The common gooseberry is grown in cooler regions of Asia but is not related to the Indian gooseberry. The Indian gooseberry is similar in color to the amla fruit but contains a smooth pit, grows on a tree, is quite fibrous, and is about the same size as a golf ball.
Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala
Common gooseberry (Ribes uva-crispa
In contrast the common gooseberry is slightly larger than a grape, grows on a bush, has a multi-seeded core, and is much sweeter than an Indian gooseberry when ripe. Common gooseberries are belong to the genus Ribes and are closely related to currants.

Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

Amla fruits keep well on the tree, but they do not keep as well after they are picked. They must be used or preserved as soon as possible after harvesting. Amla berries are so tough they must be smashed on a mortar before being cut into pieces to dry!





Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala


One of the most common ways to quickly preserve amla is to cut them into small pieces, mix them with salt and/or lime juice and allow them to sun dry. Dried amla can be used as a souring agent much like amchur in lentil preparations. 


Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala

Amla can also be candied much like ginger. Even though the box says the candy is sweet be forewarned it is VERY sour. This is a good treat to buy and share with unsuspecting non-Indians - watch their faces when they take a bite of this!
Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala
Amla berries can also be preserved in sugar syrup like jam or a traditional murabba. These are still quite tart!
Indian Gooseberry, Amla, Amalika, Emblic, Myrobalan, ingredients, indian, gooseberry, Phyllanthus emblica, fruit,mirobala
In some regions amla is commonly pickled with salt, oil, and spices to make achaar. The fiery spices and astrigent amla make for quite the hot and sour accompaniment to a meal. I was served these for breakfast one morning in Delhi alongside a paratha and a little yogurt. Oh my. Having never tasted amla before that was a puckery surprise!

So, I'm all ready to retire and plant an amla orchard! The Sheikh says no and shook his head. Well, darn. What a party pooper. 
Ever tried any amla or Indian gooseberry in any form or fashion?
Is it not the most sour thin you've ever tasted (verging on caustic)?

Calmly currying on,
Bibi

Sep 18, 2017

Jamie Oliver's Tomato & Garlic Chutney

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

This light and vibrant vegan tomato chutney is inspired by the spicy cuisine of Western India. The flavor is sweet and sour with a pleasant chilli kick. It's a great accompaniment to all sorts of foods and a fantastic way to use tomatoes when in season! Beautifully refreshing for a hot summer’s day and quite comforting with warm foods in winter.


Yes, it's another recipe for tomato chutney. Our tomato plants are still producing about a kilogram of tomatoes daily. So I've been looking for all sorts of great ways to enjoy them! "More vegetables = more healthy" - is my mantra.
Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,
Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver
A few weeks ago I was suffering through watching the famed British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver on a television cooking show. I'm more of a Team Nigella gal myself. I find Jamie annoyingly ditzy and dim much in the same vein as Gwyneth Paltrow. I do appreciate his emphasis on using ethically sourced, fresh ingredients though. Anyhow, Mr Oliver was attempting to prepare an Indian-style meal on the program. His rather imaginative idea of Indian food seems to always include fistfuls of fresh cilantro/dhania stirred in at the end of nearly EVERY dish. Curious, I ventured on to Mr Oliver's website and found this recipe.

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

Mr Oliver's tomato and garlic chutney was no exception to his cilantro/dhania fetish. A copious amount of cilantro/dhania was stirred in at the end of this recipe too. That presented a bit of a problem because during the steamy Monsoon season any tender, leafy green herb like coriander usually bolts or rots. But this week I harvested the first little scrawny bit of post-Monsoon cilantro/dhania which you see in the photo above! I hurriedly whipped this recipe up with tomatoes from our garden. I left out the sugar from the original recipe as my Kashmiri clan likes their tomatoes on the sour side. I also added a little cumin and used Kashmiri mirch for the chili powder for extra flavor. 
My Indian husband declared this the best tomato chutney yet! 
So there you have it. Authenticity be darned- this is good stuff! I you'd like less heat in your chutney try using a smoky paprika, for more heat use cayenne/degi mirch. In place of the sugar I've also tried tamarind paste which augments the sweet and sour notes of the tomatoes beautifully. Anyway you choose to make this twice cooked garlicky blend of tomatoes and cilantro/dhania it's delicious!

Ingredients:
8 garlic/lahsun cloves, peeled
8 tomatoes, roughly chopped
1 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1/2 tsp cayenne plus 1/2 tsp paprika powder)
1 tsp salt
3/4 C  water
2 TBS cooking oil
pinch of asafoetida/hing (optional)
1 tsp black mustard seeds/rai
1 tsp cumin seeds/jeera (optional)
1½ teaspoons granulated sugar or 1 teaspoon tamarind paste (optional)
1/3 C fresh coriander/dhania leaves, finely chopped

Here's what to do:
1) Put garlic cloves, tomatoes, one teaspoon salt, Kashmiri mirch, and 3/4 C water in a pan. Bring to a simmer, then cover and cook over a low heat for 15 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and leave to cool.
Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

2) When cooled transfer the contents of the pan to a blender and blend the mixture to a paste.

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

3) Heat the oil in pan set over a low heat for about 7 minutes or until oil is fragrant but not smoking. Add the asafoetida, mustard seeds, and cumin seeds.

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

4) When the seeds begin to pop, add the blended tomato mixture. Be careful as the mixture might splatter when it hits the hot oil. Cook over a low heat for 15–20 minutes until the mixture becomes a thick paste.

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

5) Stir the chopped cilantro/dhania and sugar (if using) into fried mixture and mix well. Leave the chutney to cool a little before serving. This chutney will keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
Jamie Oliver, recipe, tomato, garlic, chutney, cilantro, easy, indian, savory, simple, fresh, cooked,

Helpful hints:
I often leave out the asafoetida/hing as I find it really isn't noticeable competing with 8 cloves of garlic.

Aug 28, 2017

Bibi's Tomato and Bell Pepper Chutney

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

Get some tasty vegetables into your diet with this South Indian inspired bell pepper and tomato chutney! A savory vegan recipe that's so easy to make and a great way to enjoy Summer's bountiful produce. Pairs well with any rice or roti based meal and makes a great tortilla chip dip!

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

We're still enjoying tomatoes from our garden here in Nepal. Vegetables usually get expensive during the Monsoon season so I planted tomatoes, chili peppers, bell peppers, and eggplant in the sheltered areas of our yard. Above you see a day's harvest from our sixteen tomato plants, about a kilogram or two full pounds. You must pick tomatoes when they're not quite ripe here as they'll ripen and rot quickly in the heat and humidity of the Monsoon weather.

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

Here's about a day's harvest of bell peppers from our six bell pepper plants. Bell peppers are called capsicums or Shimla mirch in India and Nepal. What to do with all this vegetable largesse? Well, I made this recipe up! There aren't a lot of Indian or Nepali recipes for bell peppers aside from jalfrezi or tossing them into a veg omelet so I thought I'd try putting them into a South Indian inspired cooked chutney. And it worked beautifully! Now most South Indian chutneys require you to fry the vegetables first, cool them, grind them, and then fry the ground mixture again with spices. This double frying of vegetables goes on in a lot of Indian recipes. I'm not a fat-o-phobe nor a grease-o-phobe. But sometimes I think the goal of these Indian techniques is to get every pot in the kitchen dirty or to get as much grease flying around as possible! I thought about steaming the vegetables first but that's yet more gadgetry to clean. Recently, I suffered through watched a Jamie Oliver show where he made a tomato chutney by simmering the vegetables with a little water first and then frying the resulting mixture.

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

 SHABASH! (wonderful!) So I just combined the vegetables with a little water and spices in a pot and let them simmer until tender on the back burner while I cooked the rest of the day's meal. Then I let the mixture cool, ground it in the mixie, and then fried it to gorgeous glossiness. The result was fantastic! You probably do use a few less tablespoons of oil too. The spices I used were Kashmiri mirch, turmeric, cumin seeds, and black mustard seeds. Kashmiri mirch gives this condiment a rich red chili flavor with just a hint of heat. If you'd like more heat try using cayenne powder/degi mirch. If you'd like less heat try a mild and smoky paprika powder. Cumin seeds add their earthy warmth also. Turmeric is in there for it's bright color and antioxidants. Black mustard seeds add a bit of nutty flavor and are traditionally used in many South Indian cooked chutneys. If you wanted to make this even more South Indian you could fry some fresh curry leaves in the oil with the mustard seeds. Anyway you choose to spice it this recipe cooks up to a delicious, flavorful, fresh, and healthy chutney!

Ingredients:
7 medium sized tomatoes, roughly chopped
8 cloves of garlic/lahsun or 2&1/2 TBS garlic paste
1 large bell pepper/capsicum, roughly chopped
1 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1/2 tsp cayenne plus 1/2 tsp paprika)
1 tsp cumin seeds/jeera
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
3/4 C water
2 TBS cooking oil of choice
1 tsp black mustard seeds/rai
salt to taste

Here's what to do:
1) Combine tomatoes, garlic, bell pepper, Kashmiri mirch, cumin seeds, turmeric, 1/2 C water and 1 tsp salt in a deep pan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, then cover and cook over a low heat for 15 minutes.

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

2) Take the pan off the heat and leave to cool for about 15 to 20 minutes.

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

3) Transfer the contents of the pan to a mixie or blender and grind the mixture to a paste.

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

4) Heat the cooking oil in the same pan over medium heat for about 5 minutes. Add the mustard seeds. When they begin to pop, add ground tomato mixture. (Be careful when adding the tomato mixture to the hot oil as it may splatter.)

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

5) Fry mixture over low/medium heat for 15–20 minutes until it becomes a thick paste and separates from the oil. Salt to taste and allow chutney to cool a little before serving. This chutney will keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 3 days

bell pepper and tomato chutney, recipe, south indian, capsicum, tomato, fried, garlic, spicy, easy, chutney, condiment, vegan, vegetarian, indian, simple,

Helpful hints:
Kashmiri mirch gives this condiment a rich red chili flavor with just a hint of heat. If you'd like more heat try using cayenne powder/degi mirch. If you'd like less heat try a smoky paprika powder.

If you wanted to make this even more South Indian you could fry some fresh curry leaves in the oil with the mustard seeds.

Aug 7, 2017

Murgh Xacuti (Goan Spiced Chicken)

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconot, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

Pronounced 'sha-koo-tee,' this spicy chicken recipe comes from the tropical shores of Goa. A truly classic dish that can be found in almost all restaurants dotting the beaches, towns, and villages. Featuring a savory blend of rich coconut milk, hot red chilis, and aromatic spices- it's best served with steamed rice and mango chutney. 

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

This recipe is adapted from the book Recipes from an Indian Kitchen by Parragon Books Ltd. I bought this book in Delhi's IGIA duty-free shopping area on a bargain table for about $6. I've since seen it in Target stores in Florida as well as on Amazon. It's a great cookbook for the price with 100 recipes from all across India. Most of the recipes seem to be restaurant versions of regional dishes rather than from an Indian's home kitchen. It is very well written, easy enough for beginners, and all recipes are accompanied by beautiful photographs.  

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

I have made a few changes my adaption of this recipe. The original instructions called for 600g of boneless and skinless chicken pieces. I've upped the quantity of chicken to 1 kg/2.2lbs and use bone-in chicken as it's more authentic. Since I increased the quantity of chicken I increased the amount of spices accordingly. The amounts of coconut milk and water were generous to begin with so I left them the same. The recipe called for whole dried red chilis to be ground but of course I changed them to Kashmiri mirch as per my Kashmiri clan's preferences. The recipe also called for the whole spices to be dry roasted before grinding. I didn't do that. I don't think the dry roasting is a necessary step when then spices are going to be fried and then simmered with the chicken anyway. It is my understanding that dry roasting the spices is only necessary in humid climates to facilitate grinding. (You can read my diatribe on why I don't dry roasting spices here.) I think I added a bit of ginger paste to the base too. That's because ginger is good for you, I love it's lemony flavor,  and most other Xacuti recipes I've perused online include it too. Anyway, this is a really easy and really delicious South Indian style chicken curry. If you're new to making curries or a seasoned pro - I'm sure you'll enjoy this recipe as much as my family does!

Ingredients:
1kg/2lbs skinless chicken pieces
3 TBS cooking oil of choice or ghee
1/2 C onion, finely diced
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrakh paste
400ml (1 can) or 14 oz coconut milk or coconut cream
1 C water
2 tsp tamarind paste
Grind to powder for masala:
1 TBS coriander seeds/dhania
1 TBS white poppy seeds/khus khus or ground cashews
1 TBS Kashmiri mirch (or 1&1/2 tsp cayenne plus 1&1/2 tsp paprika powder)
2 tsp fennel seeds/saunf
2 tsp cumin seeds/jeera
1 tsp turmeric/hali
5 green cardamoms/elaichi
10 black peppercorns/kali mirch
5 cloves/laung
1 inch piece of cassia bark/dalchini, broken into small pieces (or 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon)

Here's what to do:
1) Grind coriander seeds, poppy seeds, Kashmiri mirch, fennel seeds, cumin seeds, turmeric, green cardamoms, cloves, and cassia bark to fine powder. Set aside. (I use a coffee grinder dedicated solely to grinding spices.)

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

2) Heat cooking oil or ghee with 2 teaspoonfuls salt in kadhai or deep heavy bottomed skillet for 5 minutes. Add diced onions and fry until beginning to brown. Add garlic paste and ginger paste and fry for about 2 minutes or until raw smell is gone from garlic.

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

3) Add ground spices for masala to the fried onions, stir well, and fry for 2 minute. Add chicken pieces to fried onion mixture in pan. Cook chicken pieces for 2 minutes on each side. If mixture begins to stick or scorch add 1/4 C water to the pan, stir well, and reduce heat.

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

4) Add coconut milk and water to pan. Stir well. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low/medium and allow to simmer gently for 20 minutes.

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconot, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

5) Stir in the tamarind paste and cook for 5 more minutes or until chicken is cooked through and tender. Salt to taste and serve immediately. 

murgh xacuti, goan, chicken, curry, easy, indian, recipe goa, coconut, simple, spicy, xacuti, murgh,

Helpful hints:
You can make the spice mixture ahead of time and store it in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.

Gorgeous Goan coastline.

Jul 24, 2017

Hot & Spicy Hyderabadi Tomato Chutney

hot and spicy hyderabadi tomato chutney, recipe, tomatoes, chutney, relish, spicy, chili, easy, Indian, vegetarian, vegan, veg, simple, hot, garlic, Madhur Jaffrey,

From Hyderabad comes this hot, garlicky, smoky, and spicy tomato chutney! Hyderabadi cuisine is known for it's lavish use of spices and love of red chilis. In this easy recipe tomatoes are simmered with roasted garlic, red chili, cumin, mustard, ginger, and fenugreek to caramelized perfection. A tasty vegan and vegetarian addition to any rice or roti based meal or a zesty new dip for tortilla chips. 

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It's that time of the year again when tomatoes are cheap and a'plenty! A cooked tomato chutney is a great way to enjoy Summer's vegetable largesse. This recipe takes about eight tomatoes and cooks down to a little less than a cup of chutney. My Kashmiri contingency here won't touch a raw tomato but when fried into a sauce or chutney they love'em! In fact, a batch of this relish lasts only a day at our house. And that's a lot of tomatoes!!! This recipe is adapted from Madhur Jaffrey's World of the East Vegetarian Cooking (1981). I bought this book from a secondhand bookstore yonks ago in San Francisco and it was fairly decrepit then. Anywho, it has 400 recipes from all over Asia that are all darned good and are suited to what you could probably find in supermarkets in the early 80's. (Nothing terribly exotic.)


Over time I have changed a few things in the recipe in accordance with my family's tastes. The original recipe called for peeling and seeding the tomatoes. We all know Bibi isn't going to do that! Didn't Ms Jaffrey's mom tell her that's were all the vitamins are? If you are the sort who seeds and peels tomatoes Ms Jaffrey also suggests canned tomatoes can be used in this recipe instead of fresh. (I would not dare to try that in our house- but it seems like it would work.) My Kashmiri clan loves their Kashmiri mirch so I've used that instead of the cayenne powder/degi mirch in the original recipe too. Feel free to adjust the amounts of red chilis in both dried and powdered form to suit your tolerance for heat. Other than that the ingredients are pretty much as in the original recipe. Are you wondering why Ms Jaffrey uses both garlic cloves and garlic paste? You'll notice the garlic cloves are fried until golden brown while the garlic paste is added later with the tomatoes. This gives both forms of garlic a different taste. This is the typical layering of flavors that makes Indian cuisine so deliciously complex. Frying the dried chilis until blackened lends the chutney a smoky flavor that's quite nice and very Hyderabadi too. I do prefer to run the chutney through the mixie after cooking and cooling. Ms Jaffrey does not advise this but the dried chilis and garlic cloves don't always break down into small pieces during cooking. I fear someone eating the chutney might get a big unpleasant bite of garlic or dried chili. Yikes! So I blitz the fried mixture in the mixie when cool to a lovely smooth texture. Enjoy!

Ingredients:
2 TBS cooking oil
4 garlic/lahsun cloves, peeled and minced
1 tsp cumin/jeera seeds
1/2 tsp black mustard/rai seeds
1/4 tsp  fenugreek/methi seeds
2-3 whole dried hot chili peppers (use less for less heat
1 tsp salt, or to taste
Mix together in a bowl:
2 C roughly chopped tomatoes, (canned tomatoes will work for this recipe too)
1 tsp ginger/adrak paste
1 tsp garlic/lahsun paste
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
1/4 to 1 tsp Kashmiri chili powder/mirch (or 1/2 tsp cayenne/degi plus 1/2 tsp paprika powder)

Here's what to do:
1) Mix the tomatoes, ginger paste, garlic paste, turmeric, and Kashmiri mirch in a bowl and mix. Set aside.

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2) Heat the oil and one teaspoonful salt in a heavy skillet over medium for about 5 minutes. Add the garlic cloves, stir and fry until lightly brown. Add the cumin, mustard, and fenugreek. Let sizzle for a couple seconds and add the dried chili peppers. They should puff up and darken.

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3) Add the tomato mixture to the spices in the hot oil. (Be careful as it could splatter when it hits the hot oil). Stir and cook on medium heat for 10-12 minutes, or until the liquid is reduced and oil separates from the mixture. (If mixture begins to stick or scorch reduce heat and add 1/4 cup water- but keep stirring!) Use a wooden spoon to mash the tomatoes and garlic cloves into a paste.

hot and spicy hyderabadi tomato chutney, recipe, tomatoes, chutney, relish, spicy, chili, easy, Indian, vegetarian, vegan, veg, simple, hot, garlic, Madhur Jaffrey,
hot and spicy hyderabadi tomato chutney, recipe, tomatoes, chutney, relish, spicy, chili, easy, Indian, vegetarian, vegan, veg, simple, hot, garlic, Madhur Jaffrey,

4) The chutney is cooked when the oil separates from the mixture and rises to the top. Salt to taste. You should have about 3/4 cup of chutney. If your chutney isn't as smooth as you prefer allow the mixture to cool for about 15 minutes and run it through a mixie or blender. Serve hot, cold, or at room temperature. Keeps well in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

hot and spicy hyderabadi tomato chutney, recipe, tomatoes, chutney, relish, spicy, chili, easy, Indian, vegetarian, vegan, veg, simple, hot, garlic, Madhur Jaffrey,

Helpful Hints:
When salting chutneys to eat with rice and or rotis you'll want to add just a little more salt than you think you should. Like maybe 5% more. Remember that rice and rotis are generally served unsalted and chutneys or relishes served with them provide the salt that makes them tasty.

Ladies Sharing Wine, India, Andhra Pradesh, Hyderabad
Early 18th century Drawings; watercolors, ink, opaque watercolor, and gold on paper. 
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