Showing posts with label Curries. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Curries. Show all posts

Apr 7, 2016

Malabar Style Chicken Curry

Malabar Style Chicken Curry

On the southwestern coast of India lies the beautiful region of Malabar. A lush tropical paradise long known as the "Land of Spices" that lies between the Arabian Sea and the Western Ghats. Malabar's astonishingly diverse cuisine is the result of the influence of Arabic, Syrian, Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese, and British spice traders over the centuries. A lavish use of spices, tart tamarind, and rich coconut are the hallmarks of Malabar cuisine. This boldly spiced brilliant red chicken curry is typical of Malabar's delicious dishes. Mellowed by sweet and sumptuous coconut milk the spices present as warmly aromatic rather than fiery hot. The sweet and sour tang of tamarind perfectly accentuates the combination of assertive flavors. This chicken curry is easy to make and it's rich gravy pairs well with steamed rice, chapattis, pulao, appam, or pathiri. 



Ingredients:
1 kg/2lbs chicken, skinless, cut into 6-8 pieces
3 TBS cooking oil
2 onions, sliced into thin half moons
1 tsp salt
2 inch piece of cassia bark/dalchini (or cinnamon stick)
2 tomatoes, diced finely
2-3 green chilis/hari mirch, chopped
1 can coconut milk (400ml)
2 tsp tamarind paste
Mix for marinade:
3 TBS yogurt/dahi
2 TBS garlic paste
1 TBS ginger paste
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
Grind to smooth paste for masala:
1 TBS lime juice
1 TBS water
3 whole star anise/phoolchakri
9 cloves/laung
15 black peppercorns/kali mirch
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp paprika + 1 tsp cayenne powder)
2 tsp ground coriander/dhania
2 tsp ground cumin/jeera
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi

Here's what to do:
1) Mix yogurt, garlic, ginger, 1 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp tumeric together for marinade. Coat all chicken pieces in marinade mix and place in sealable airtight container. Allow chicken to marinate for 30 minutes up to overnight in the refrigerator.


2) When ready to cook grind all ingredients listed under masala to smooth paste, and set aside. Heat oil in deep heavy bottomed skillet or kadhai and fry sliced onions with 1 tsp salt until just beginning to brown.


3) Add cassia bark/dalchini and ground masala paste to fried onions. Stir well and fry for 2 minutes. Add tomatoes and green chilis, stir well and fry until tomatoes soften.


4) Add marinated chicken pieces to fried onion and masala mixture in pan. Allow chicken pieces to fry for 4 minutes on each side, the chicken should just be turning white. If masala mixture begins to stick or scorch reduce heat and add 1/4 C water.


5) Add can of coconut milk and teaspoon of tamarind paste to chicken and masala mixture in pan, stir well. Allow mixture to simmer uncovered over medium low heat for 20 to 25 minutes. If mixture begins to stick or scorch reduce heat and add 1/4 water.


6) When chicken has cooked through and oil separates from gravy your dish is ready. Salt to taste and serve.

Helpful Hints:

Never cook chicken in a pressure cooker, it gets a rubbery texture from the extreme, high heat.

If you don't have Kashmiri mirch a good substitute is 1/2 paprika plus 1/2 cayenne powder.



An interesting aside:
I have been notified that I have been nominated for the "Best Food Blog"  AND "Best New Blog" awards on the  nepaliaustralian blog so get on over there and vote for my blog if you choose at:


Be sure to check out all the other amazing blogs in all the different categories and vote for all your favorites!!! Winners will be announced in May.

Mar 3, 2016

Kashmiri Ghanduh Maaz (Mutton with Onions)

mutton curry lamb onions kashmiri indian Kashmiri Indian easy recipe

In Kashmiri "ghanduh" means onion and "maaz" means mutton. This hearty homestyle dish is commonly served in Kashmir and has a rich, spicy broth much like a stew. So easy to make for a delicious Fall or Winter meal, serve with steamed rice, pulao, rotis, or a simple loaf of crusty bread. This recipe also works well with lamb or beef stew meat.

Mutton is a daily staple in a Kashmiri household, chicken and fish are almost considered vegetables. You have not properly eaten in Kashmir unless your meal contains some form of mutton. It is considered the utmost in Kashmiri hospitality to serve a guest as much mutton as possible. (Even if they are vegetarian.) This recipe also works well with lamb or beef stew meat.

Ingredients:
1 kg/2lbs mutton/goat or lamb, cut into 3 inch pieces, bone in preferred
3 TBS cooking oil, (mustard oil if you wish to be authentic)
2 tsp salt
2 C onions, sliced into wedges
1/2 C tomatoes/tamatar, diced finely
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrak paste
1 TBS coriander/dhania, ground
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp paprika plus 1 tsp cayenne)
1/2 tsp dry ginger/adrak
1/4 tsp turmeric/haldi
5 cloves/laung
7 green cardamoms/elaichi, bruised with mortar & pestle
2 inch piece cassia bark/dalchini
1&1/2 tsp cumin/jeera seeds
15 black peppercorns/kali mirch, coarsely ground
1 cassia leaf/tej patta or 2 small ones

Here's what to do:
1) In a pressure cooker or deep, heavy bottomed skillet or stock pot heat oil with 2 tsp salt for 5 minutes. Add mutton pieces and fry until beginning to brown. Depending on how fresh your mutton is, or whether you're using lamb or beef, this may take 10 to 15 minutes.

This is the brown we're looking for.
The Kashmiris call this "red."
2) Add onions and tomatoes. Stir well and continue cooking until onions are translucent and tomatoes have softened, about 5-7 minutes. (This is not a browned onion dish.)


3) Add 1/2 C water, garlic paste, ginger paste, whole spices, powdered spices, and cassia leaves/tej patta. Stir well and simmer for 5 minutes.


4) Add 3 cups water or at least enough so there is water covering the meat mixture if using pressure cooker. Seal up pressure cooker & continue cooking for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using deep skillet or stock pot add enough water so that meat mixture is covered by at least 3 inches. Simmer without lid until meat is of desired tenderness, adding water if necessary. Salt to taste and serve.

Helpful Hints:
If you are married to a Kashmiri do not ever be a dumb "nabrim" (outsider) and serve your Kashmiri in laws chicken or fish without at least one mutton dish at a meal. I'm still not hearing the end of it. Who knew?

Mutton? NAH!!!

Feb 25, 2016

Punjabi Dhaba Style Mutton

Indian lamb goat spicy easy curry

Punjabi dhabas are small restaurants you'll see at truck stops, near gas stations, bus stops, and taxi stands across India. After the Partition many Punjabi refugees found work as truck, taxi, and bus drivers. These Punjabi run family restaurants served home style meals to the Punjabi drivers. The decor is usually quite simple and Bollywood tunes or films are often blaring on the radio or television to complete the "homely" ambiance. Dhaba restaurants are now popular with all members of the traveling public along India's burgeoning highway system, not just Punjabi drivers. This is my version of the traditional North Indian mutton curry served at India's famed Punjabi dhabas. This recipe also works well with lamb, beef, or water buffalo stew meat. 


Ingredients:
1kg/2lbs mutton/goat, cut into 3 inch pieces, bone in preferred
2 C onions, pureed
2 tsp salt
3 TBS ghee or cooking oil
2 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrak paste
2 green chilis/hari mirch, chopped coarsely
2 inch piece cassia bark/dalchini (or cinnamon stick)
2 cassia leaves/tej patta
5 cloves/laung
3 black cardamoms/kali elaichi, bruised with mortar and pestle
15 black peppercorns/kali mirch, coarsely ground
Grind until smooth puree for masala-
2 TBS cumin/jeera, ground
1 TBS coriander/dhania, ground
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch
1 tsp garam masala
1/4 tsp turmeric/haldi
2 C fresh tomatoes, chopped roughly
2 tsp salt

Here's what to do:
1) Grind onions to a smooth puree.  Set aside. 


2) Grind all ingredients listed under "masala" to a smooth paste. Set aside.


3) Heat ghee or cooking oil in a pressure cooker, heavy bottomed skillet or kadhai. Fry onion paste with 2 tsp salt until brown over medium heat. This usually takes me about 9-10 minutes.


4) Add garlic, ginger, green chilis, whole spices and cassia leaves/tej patta to fried onion paste. Fry for about 2 minutes.


5) Add mutton pieces to onion and spice mixture. Stir well and fry for 5 minutes.


6) Add ground masala mixture to mutton, onions, and spices. Stir well and bring to a simmer. If using a pressure cooker, seal and let cook for 5 to 6 whistles or until mutton is tender. If using a skillet or kadhai allow to simmer over medium heat until meat is tender adding water if necessary.


7) When the meat is tender and oil has separated from the gravy your dish is ready. Salt to taste and serve.

Helpful hints:

This recipe also works well with lamb, beef, or water buffalo stew meat. Adjust cooking times and methods accordingly.

"HORN OK PLEASE"

Feb 19, 2016

Nepali Rahar Dal (Curried Pigeon Peas)

The national dish of Nepal is Dal Bhat and consists of a huge serving of steamed white rice (bhat) and a healthy helping of cooked lentils (dal). A common greeting in Nepal is "Bhat-kyo?" which literally means "Have you eaten rice today?" There are many different dals that can be prepared in several different ways. This is a simple and tasty recipe for dal made with split pigeon peas which are called rahar in Nepali, but are called toor or toovar dal in India.

Nepali Rahar Dal curried pigeon peas easy vegetarian lentil recipe

This recipe is so easy to make and is a family favorite in our house. Traditionally, Nepalis would serve this with rice, a serving of tarkaari (vegetables), a chutney or two, and perhaps some acchaari (pickles). This dish also makes for a delicious Autumn meal when served as a soup with a crusty slice of buttered bread in Western fashion also.

Ingredients:
1&1/2 C split pigeon peas/toor dal/rahar dal
3 TBS ghee or cooking oil
1/2 C onion, diced finely
2 tsp ginger/adrak paste
2 tsp garlic/lahsun paste
2 green chilis/hari mirch, chopped finely (omit for less heat)
1 cassia leaf/tej patta
1&1/2 tsp cumin/jeera seeds
3 cloves/laung
1 inch piece cassia bark/dalchini (or cinnamon stick)
1/2 tsp turmeric/haldi
2 tsp salt
6-8 C water
1 TBS lime juice (optional)

Here's what to do:
1) Heat ghee or cooking oil over medium heat in a large stock pot or pressure cooker. Fry onions until  just beginning to brown. Add ginger, garlic, and green chilis and fry for 3-4 minutes or until raw smell has left garlic. Add cassia leaf, cumin seeds, cloves, and cassia bark and fry for 2 minutes.

All the spices are tempered.
2) Add turmeric, salt, and pigeon peas to pot. If using pressure cooker add enough water so that dal is covered by at least 2 inches, seal and allow to steam for 4-5 whistles. Remove pressure cooker from heat and allow to cool. (If cooking on burner with stock pot add enough water so that dal mixture is covered by 4 inches and bring to a boil over medium heat. Allow to simmer until dal is are tender, usually about one and a half hours. Stir frequently and add more water if necessary.) When dal is to preferred consistency stir in lime juice, salt to taste and serve.

Add turmeric, salt, pigeon peas and a lot of water.
Helpful Hints:
I would really recommend cooking this in a pressure cooker or crock pot/slow cooker as it takes such a long time to cook on top of the stove.

Our neighbor Ganga says "Ramro!" which means "Excellent!" in Nepali.

Feb 12, 2016

Kathmandu Style Mutton Curry

Nepal is an amazing place of beautiful mountains, lush valleys, and rich cultural heritage. Although it is a tiny nation only about the size of the American state of Arkansas,  it is home to many different ethnicities and cuisines. All Nepali cuisines are influenced by it's neighbors: India, Tibet, and China. This curry's fusion of Indian spices with the Chinese touch of spring onions results in uniquely Nepali dish. I first tasted this delicious curry in a restaurant in Nepal's very multicultural capital, Kathmandu.


Nepali mutton curry kathmand

Ingredients:
1kg/2lbs goat/mutton, lean & bone in preferred, cut into 3 inch pieces
3 TBS cooking oil (mustard oil if you wish to be authentic)
1 TBS ghee
2 C onions, finely sliced into half moons
3 cassia leaves/tej patta
1/4 C cilantro/dhania, chopped roughly
3 spring onions, green tops only snipped into 1 inch pieces
Grind to smooth paste for marinade:
1/2 C yogurt/dahi
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger paste
1 C onion, roughly chopped
1 C tomato, roughly chopped
1 TBS ground coriander/dhania
1 TBS ground cumin/jeera
2 tsp fennel/saunf seeds
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp cayenne plus 1 tsp paprika)
2 tsp garam masala
1/2 tsp turmeric
2 tsp salt

Ingredients for marinade.
Here's what to do:
1) Grind all ingredients listed under marinade to smooth paste in mixie, food processor, or blender.

The marinade is mixed.
2) In an airtight container combine marinade paste with mutton, make sure each piece is thoroughly coated. Seal container and allow meat to marinate for at least four hours or up to overnight in the refrigerator.

All meat pieces thoroughly coated in marinade.

Sealed up & ready to go into the refrigerator.

3) When ready to cook, heat oil and ghee in pressure cooker or a deep, heavy bottomed skillet. Fry finely sliced onions until a deep brown.


4) Add tej patta/cassia leaves and mutton pieces, and marinade to the fried onions. Stir well and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer stirring frequently for 8 minutes. If mixture begins to scorch add 1/4 C water, reduce heat and continue cooking.


5) If using pressure cooker add chopped cilantro/dhania, snipped spring onion tops, and 3 C water to mixture and stir well. Seal pressure cooker and allow to cook for 5-6 whistles or until meat is to desired tenderness. If using deep, heavy bottomed pot or skillet add chopped cilantro/dhania, snipped spring onion tops, and enough water to cover mixture by 2 inches. Stir well and bring to a simmer. Allow to simmer until meat is to desired tenderness and gravy is to desired consistency. The traditional Nepali way to cook this kind of curry is to allow it to slowly simmer over a couple of hours, adding water in small amounts (usually 1/2 C water at a time) until meat is to desired tenderness and gravy is to desired consistency.


6) Salt to taste and serve with steamed rice, achaari/pickles, a tarkaari/vegetable dish, a fresh chutney/chatni, and roti. Actually it's great with just buttered hunk of French bread too.


Helpful Hints:

Not fond of goat? This recipe works well with beef, lamb, venison, or water buffalo stew meat also.

Feb 2, 2016

Tamatar Bhindi (Okra with Tomatoes)

indian recipe east okra tomato curry

"Bhindi" means okra and "tamatar" means tomatoes. Okra is simmered until tender in a rich and spicy tomato sauce in this easy to make dish. Bold with the flavors of Indian spices but mild in heat this recipe pairs well with rice, rotis, or chapattis.

Ingredients:
3 C okra/bhindi (fresh or frozen and thawed), chopped into 1/2 inch rounds
2 onions, sliced thinly into half moons
2 tsp garlic/lahsun paste
1 tsp cumin/jeera seeds
3 TBS cooking oil of your choice
Grind until smooth for masala sauce:
3 tomatoes/tamatar, about 1&1/2 C roughly chopped
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp paprika plus 1 tsp cayenne)
2 tsp ground cumin/jeera
2 tsp ground coriander/dhania
1/2 tsp tumeric/haldi
1 tsp salt
1 C water
Here's what to do:
1) Grind all ingredients listed under masala sauce until smooth in mixie, food processor, or blender until smooth. Set aside. (If you don't have a mixie, food processor or blender just chop the tomatoes finely and mix with ground spices.)


2) Heat oil in heavy bottomed skillet or kadhai for 5 minutes. Add onions and fry until beginning to brown. Add garlic and cumin seeds, fry for 2 minutes.


3) Add chopped okra, stir well.


4) Add tomato mixture to fried onions and okra, stir well. Allow to simmer for 8-10 minutes uncovered. Stir occasionally, if mixture begins to stick or scorch add another 1/4 C water.


5) Keep simmering until most of liquid has evaporated, okra has cooked to desired tenderness, and oil has separated from the sauce. Salt to taste and serve. 



Nov 23, 2015

Delhi Style Chicken Curry

Delhi Style Chicken Curry

A lovely aunty from Delhi taught me how to make this traditional North Indian chicken curry a few years ago. Sumptuously spiced, yet bold and bright with the flavor of fresh cilantro and warm cardamom with a deliciously rich red gravy. So simple to prepare and always a family favorite around here. A great recipe to try if you are new to making curries. 


Ingredients-
1 cut up whole chicken, skinless, washed & cut into 8-10 pieces
3 TBS oil
2 onions, thinly sliced into half moons
Grind to paste for marinade-
1 C yoghurt/dahi
1/2 C onions, roughly chopped (optional for thicker gravy)
2 tomatoes, roughly chopped
1 TBS garlic/lahsun paste
1 TBS ginger/adrak paste
2 tsp Kashmiri mirch (or 1 tsp paprika plus 1 tsp cayenne powder)
1/4 tsp turmeric/haldi
1 TBS ground coriander/dhania seeds
5 green cardamoms/elaichi
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon/dalchini
1 TBS white poppy seeds/khus khus (or ground almonds or cashews)
1/4 C fresh cilantro/dhania, chopped 
2 green chilies/hari mirch, roughly chopped (optional, for less heat omit)
2 tsp salt

Here's what to do-
1) Grind all ingredients listed under marinade to a smooth paste in a mixie, blender or food processor. Coat chicken pieces well with marinade paste. Allow chicken to marinate for at least 1 hour up to overnight in a sealed airtight container in the refrigerator.




2) Heat oil in deep, heavy bottomed skillet or kadhai, and fry sliced onions over medium heat until translucent & beginning to brown at the edges.



3) Add chicken pieces to frying onions in pan. Be careful as oil may spatter. Fry chicken pieces for 2 minutes on each side. Add marinade to chicken and onions in pan, stir well and simmer for 7 minutes. Add 1 cup water to mixture & continue to simmer uncovered over medium heat for 20-25 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. Be sure to simmer this dish uncovered, it may boil over if covered. If mixture begins to burn, scorch, or stick, stir in 1/2 cup water and reduce heat.


4) When the oil has separated from the marinade mixture and the chicken is cooked through your curry is ready. Salt to taste and serve.


Helpful Hints:
Never cook chicken in a pressure cooker, it gets a rubbery texture from the extreme, high heat.
Don't have poppy seeds? Substitute 1 TBS ground almonds or cashews.
Don't have Kashmiri mirch? Substitute a mixture of 1/2 cayenne powder plus 1/2 sweet paprika.
Don't have yogurt?  Well, living in Nepal sometimes we can't get yogurt here, so on occasion I've used a 1 C full fat milk with excellent results also!
If you wish to make this dish really posh and rich, substitute cream for the yogurt and ghee for the cooking oil.

And above all.....
Keep calm & curry on.

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