Jan 7, 2019

How to make Tahini

diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,

Tahini is a paste made from sesame seeds and is a staple in many cuisines, especially in the Middle East. Here's my quick and easy technique to make tahini that tastes so much better than anything store bought!

diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,
Tahini grinding mill in the Old City of Jerusalem, Israel
The word tahini is derived from the Arabic verb "طحن " or "ṭaḥana" meaning "to grind." Tahini is known throughout the Middle East by various names. In Iraq it is called rashi, in Kuwait harda, in Iran ardeh, in Cyprus tashi, in Israel t'hina, and in Turkey tahin. It is often served as a dip on its own or as a component of hummus, baba ghanoush, and halva. Tahini is a great source of calcium, manganese, the amino acid methionine, and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. Compared to peanut butter, tahini has higher levels of fiber and calcium and lower levels of sugar and saturated fats.
diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,

My favorite way to eat tahini is on toast or straight from a spoon, I love its peanut butter-y flavor. I prefer to make my tahini with sesame seeds that have been deeply toasted but you can dry roast (or not) your sesame seeds to any degree you wish. I use rice bran oil to make tahini although olive oil is more traditional. (Really any neutral tasting oil will do.) The sesame seeds we get here in Nepal are a mix of hulled and unhulled, you will most likely only see the hulled, white version in western countries. Unhulled sesame seeds result in a darker color and nuttier flavored tahini. A pinch of salt improves flavor and helps preserve the tahini but is optional. Any way you choose to make tahini, I'm sure you'll agree it's easy to make and much tastier than readymade:

Ingredients:
1 C sesame seeds
3-4 TBS oil of choice (olive oil is traditional but I use rice bran oil)
1/2 tsp salt (optional)

Here's what to do:
1) Preheat oven to 350F/175C. Spread sesame seeds onto a baking sheet. Bake in the preheated oven until seeds are fragrant, stirring every few minutes, usually about 10 to 12 minutes. OR Heat a heavy-duty skillet over medium-high heat and add the sesame seeds. Stir frequently until they begin to turn golden brown and then stir constantly for about 4-5 minutes.  Be careful, sesame seeds burn very easily.

diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,

2) Allow toasted seeds to cool and transfer to a mixie or blender and add oil and salt (if using).


diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,

3) Blend until smooth, adding additional oil if needed. The goal is a thick, yet pourable texture. Refrigerate in a sealed container. This tahini should last for 1 month if refrigerated. The oil may separate, so stir it together if needed when using. You may need to bring it room temperature to stir it together if it’s become too solid. Makes about 3/4C depending on how much oil you use.

diy, easy, healthy, home made, inexpensive, oil, Recipe, seeds, sesame, simple, tahini, vegan,



Anybody else make their own tahini?

What are your favorite recipes with tahini?

Calmly currying on,
Bibi

12 comments:

  1. i´m good if i make the very occasial hummus myself ;-D
    so a glas of ready made tahini sleeps in the fridge....
    but its always interesting to learn how thing are made! thanks! and maybe one day :-D
    xxxxx

    ReplyDelete
  2. I buy mine readymade, but like Beate I make my own hummus. I'm not sure if my minihack could grind sesame seeds finely enough to make tahini.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mim,
      Hmmmm, my Indian mixie does just fine grinding sesame seeds with a little oil and the blades are set high like those little food processors.
      xox

      Delete
  3. I love hummus but Jon doesn't so I only ever have it in restaurants - boo! xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vix,
      I've nnever made hummus at home myself- when I lived in California the readymade kind was easily available!
      xox

      Delete
  4. Easy and fantastic. I can imagine eating tahini with parathas perhaps. This is definetely the seasame seeds season till the winter fesrival of lohri. Winter chills, sesame seeds, jaggery and peanuts go together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Apple,
      Yes! All those foods are so full of energy!
      xox

      Delete
  5. I make my own. Danny's only serious illness came after eating tahini we bought in a small market-could have been mould, pesticide-who knows? It wasn't sesame or nuts as we guessed at the time. "I don't want any sketchy tahini" is now part of our family vocabulary. It goes rancid after a time anyway, so might as well make it fresh in smal batches. Still can't get him to touch halavah, homemade tahini or not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Goody,
      Moulds are famous for triggering allergies.
      I have not made halva in a long time! I shall have to try it again.

      Delete
  6. The only time I ate tahini (in a restaurant)I suffered an upset stomach so it may not have been the tahini; yet I can eat sesame seed bars with no effects at all!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vronni,
      Wow! Tahini seems to be a real troublemaker.

      Delete

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