Apr 12, 2017

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,For a more authentic Indian take on curried deviled eggs try this recipe with garam masala instead of curry powder. Garam masala is a traditional Indian spice mix whose warm and peppery notes brilliantly contrast with creamy egg yolks. Tangy tamarind from Worcestershire sauce and tart lime lend added zest to this dish also. An easy treat to make that can be served as an elegant appetizer before a posh dinner or at a springtime picnic!

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,
Nepali Style Garam Masala
I really think garam masala works much better with deviled eggs than the usual curry powder. Traditional blends of garam masalas are varying ratios of black pepper, cassia/cinnamon, cloves, cardamom, nutmeg, and possibly cumin, fennel, or star anise. The slightly sweet and richly aromatic warmth of these spices are far more complimentary to the delicate, creamy flavor of hard-cooked eggs than the readymade curry powders you'll find in western markets. Most of the curry powders you find for sale in western countries are far too harsh and fenugreek heavy. Try this recipe with your favorite store-bought brand of garam masala or make your own with one of these regional recipes from South Asia: Nepali Style Garam Masala, Basic Garam Masala, Mughlai Garam Masala, Kashmiri Garam Masala, or Parsi Garam Masala.

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

This recipe came about as I was looking for an appetizer to serve at a dinner party we were hosting. I wanted to showcase the beautiful eggs we have here in Nepal. (Above you see our handsome Gaston in black and white checks with with his lovely ladyfriend in red, Mademoiselle Belle.) We certainly don't have any curry powder in our Indian household so I used a recent batch of garam masala I had made. Shabash! It was a hit at the dinner party and has been requested at every meal we've hosted since! My Indian husband had never tasted deviled eggs of any sort but now these are his favorite which he lovingly calls "Eggs with cream." (Most Indians call mayonnaise cream.)

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

Look what I found at our local supermarket! All the way from New Orleans it's Crystal brand Worcestershire sauce. It's somewhat the worse for wear as one of the bottles in the case broke and leaked all over. How it got to Nepal from Louisiana boggles my mind. I do love the sharp, sweet, and tangy tinge of tamarind that worcestershire sauce gives to these deviled eggs. Worcestershire sauce has a slight asafoetida/hing-like umami punch that adds Indian flair too. I put a pinch of turmeric in for rich color and to cut the eggy taste a bit. Lime juice is another ingredient typical of Indian cuisine that brings it's floral tartness. Cilantro's fresh green herbaceous note is typically Indian also.You could certainly customize this recipe to your tastes and to what you have on hand. In place of the cilantro I've tried fresh mint, chopped chives, chopped olives, chopped cornichons, mango chutney, finely diced radish, finely diced red onions, and pickled jalapenos with great result!And so without further ado is the recipe:

Ingredients:
6 eggs, hard-cooked and peeled.
1/4 C mayonnaise
1 TBS lime/nimbu juice (or 2 tsp white vinegar)
1 tsp ground mustard powder or prepared mustard
1 tsp garam masala
1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 TBS chopped cilantro/dhania (fresh mint, chives, chopped olives, chopped cornichons, mango chutney, finely diced radish, & pickled jalapenos are all options too)
salt to taste
For garnish: paprika, Kashmiri mirch, cayenne powder, chopped mint or cilantro

Here's what to do: 
1) Slice peeled hard-boiled eggs in half lengthwise, removing yolks to a mixing bowl. Placed halved whites on a serving platter.
Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

2) Combine yolks with the mayonnaise, lime juice, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, garam masala, turmeric, chopped cilantro, and 1/2 teaspoonful salt in mixing bowl.

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

3) Mix ingredients until creamy using fork, food processor, blender, or mixie. Adjust salt to taste.

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

4) Spoon or pipe egg yolk mixture into halved egg whites. For a do-it-yourself pastry bag, clip the end of a small sandwich bag and fill with the egg yolk mixture. Gently squeeze the bag from the top to pipe the mixture into the egg white halves.

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

5) Garnish each egg with chopped mint or cilantro. Sprinkle a little Kashmiri mirch, paprika, or cayenne pepper for an extra kick of flavor and color. This recipe can be made up to 4 hours ahead of serving. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Makes 12 deviled eggs.

Garam Masala Deviled Eggs, garam masala, eggs, easter, recipe, easy, indian, deviled, spicy, worcestershire, hard boiled, hard cooked, vegetarian,

18 comments:

  1. I do love a deviled egg, it's part of my repertoire when I throw a retro party.
    How cheeky that the Americans call their sauce Worcestershire! Worcestershire is our neighbouring county. I thought Lea and Perrins was available the world over, I've definitely seen it in Goa! I can't eat it, it's got anchovies in it. xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Vix,
      L&P is available in the US but Louisiana has their own version of it. No seafood dish in Louisiana would be complete without Worcestershire sauce & tabasco sauce. The Louisiana version of L&P has a more pronounced bellpepper/capsicum note.
      The label on L&P states that it was created by the Worcester chemists John Wheeley Lea and William Henry Perrins, "from the recipe of a nobleman in the county." A high court decided on July 26, 1876 that Lea & Perrins did not have the rights to the term Worcestershire sauce, and so the name is not trademarked.
      This recipe is delicious even without the worcestershire sauce though!
      xox

      Delete
  2. Sabash, Glorious golden eggs with spices. Boiled eggs have been my favourite since childhood. I personally like half boiled eggs where the yolk is slighly semi solid melting away, like molten gold. Never been very fond of solid yolk.

    We have Bengali dish called “Deemear Debhil” (Egg Devil). I think it came with the British and later desified by us. There are different versions of it, with our without the intact yolk, but mostly with a batter of mashed potatoes. This is much loved Bengali snack.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXe6uFc7eaw

    Apple

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Apple,
      I'm not fond of solid yolks either but whip them with spices & mayo and they are soft, creamy & delicious!
      Dimer Debhil looks like what the British call a Scotch egg.

      Delete
    2. There was definitely an Anglo-Burmese version of scotch eggs made in Burma. It makes sense for there to be Indian variants.

      (I know we Brits have a bad reputation for food, but Scotch eggs are delicious.)

      Delete
    3. Hi Mim,
      Quite an odd term 'deviled."
      According to the Oxford Companion to Food,
      Devil--a culinary term which first appeared as a noun in the 18th century, and then in the early 19th century as a verb meaning to cook something with fiery hot spices or condiments. . . . The term was presumably adopted because of the connection between the devil and the excessive heat in Hell.

      Hmm, I thought it just meant mincing something to a paste. Our deviled ham in the US isn't very spicy.

      Lyle's Golden Syrup is the UK's greatest culinary achievement IMHO!

      Delete
  3. Thank you, Bibi, for providing this recipe just in time for Easter! The local hens have resumed laying, I've a dozen of their best "aging" in the 'fridge, and next week I'll be joining friends in an expedition to The Jungle (Jungle Jim's truly super market) in Fairfield, Ohio for a fresh supply of garam masala. Might one inquire, please, if you were to purchase garam masala in a box, which brand do you prefer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Beth,
      You are welcome!
      I like the MDH and Catch brands of garam masala. Both are very old companies from Delhi and have great quality spice mixes that are very authentic. They are also foil packed inside the box so they are quite fresh- just depot them to a sealed jar & keep them in a cabinet out of sunlight.

      Delete
  4. Well that sounds much better than my standard deviled eggs made with yoghurt and paprika.

    We'll have plenty of eggs to deal with after Easter, so this recipe is getting printed and taped to the fridge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Goody,
      Hope you enjoy the recipe & have a Happy Easter!

      Delete
  5. I was only talking about your garam masala recipes with my husband this morning - we've run out of the bought stuff, so I plan to make one of yours to refill the jar.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mim,
      Be sure and let me know how it turns out!

      Delete
  6. @Bibi

    It seems that nothing is safe these days. There have been reports of fake plastic eggs sold in the market.

    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/plastic-eggs-sold-to-woman-in-kolkata-one-held-1675778

    Apple

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh I do love the names of your feathered friends, mine all have names!!! And the eggs look delish!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Sue,
      Thank you!
      Yes, we name all our creatures too!

      Delete
  8. Part of my family are Bangalorean Anglo-Indians, garam-massala and eggs were always a favourite of my grandmother, except scrambled for breakfast! This way is much more stylish, I will definitely be trying these out come picnic season.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Perdita,
      How interesting! Hope you like the recipe & thank you for stopping by!

      Delete

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